Tupaia Captain Cook s Polynesian Navigator Tupaia was the brilliant Polynesian navigator and translator who sailed with Captain James Cook from Tahiti piloted the Endeavour across the South Pacific and interceded on behalf of the European vo

  • Title: Tupaia: Captain Cook's Polynesian Navigator
  • Author: Joan Druett
  • ISBN: 9780313387487
  • Page: 186
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Tupaia was the brilliant Polynesian navigator and translator who sailed with Captain James Cook from Tahiti, piloted the Endeavour across the South Pacific, and interceded on behalf of the European voyagers with the warrior Maori of New Zealand As a man of high social ranking, Tupaia was also invaluable as an intermediary, interpreting local rituals and ceremonies JoseTupaia was the brilliant Polynesian navigator and translator who sailed with Captain James Cook from Tahiti, piloted the Endeavour across the South Pacific, and interceded on behalf of the European voyagers with the warrior Maori of New Zealand As a man of high social ranking, Tupaia was also invaluable as an intermediary, interpreting local rituals and ceremonies Joseph Banks, the botanist with Cook s expedition, is famous for describing the manners and customs of the Polynesian people in detail Much of the credit for this information rightfully belongs to Tupaia indeed, he could aptly be called the Pacific s first anthropologist.Despite all this, Tupaia s colorful tale has never been part of the popular Captain Cook legend This unique book tells the first contact story with Europeans as seen through the eyes of the Polynesians, and documents how Tupaia s contributions changed the history of the Pacific.

    • Tupaia: Captain Cook's Polynesian Navigator >> Joan Druett
      186 Joan Druett
    • thumbnail Title: Tupaia: Captain Cook's Polynesian Navigator >> Joan Druett
      Posted by:Joan Druett
      Published :2019-09-12T01:13:21+00:00

    About "Joan Druett"

    1. Joan Druett

      Back in the year 1984, on the picture poster tropical island of Rarotonga, I literally fell into whaling history when I tumbled into a grave A great tree had been felled by a recent hurricane, exposing a gravestone that had been hidden for than one and a half centuries It was the memorial to a young whaling wife, who had sailed with her husband on the New Bedford ship Harrison in the year 1845 And so my fascination with maritime history was triggered resulting in 18 books so far The latest number nineteen is a biography of a truly extraordinary man, Tupaia, star navigator and creator of amazing art.

    190 thoughts on “Tupaia: Captain Cook's Polynesian Navigator”

    1. The engrossing story of a fascinating man. Skilled navigator, translator, orator, artist, politician, intermediary between European and Maori. Tupaia was quite probably seen by Maori as the leader of Cook's first expedition; understandably so. He certainly seems to have been responsible for much of its success.Druett combines careful research with an accessible style and a rollicking pace, and gives us a thoroughly good read. Tupaia has waited far too long for an in-depth biography; in Druett he [...]


    2. Joan Druett’s new book, Tupaia – Captain Cook’s Polynesian Navigator, fills an important blank space in the history, as well as the legend, of Captain Cook. On his first voyage to the Pacific in HMS Endeavour, during a stop in Tahiti, Cook took aboard a Polynesian high priest named Tupaia. Tupaia was also a skilled navigator and would serve as translator and diplomat for Cook when he encountered the warlike Maoris of New Zealand.While Tupaia played a critical role in the success of Cook’ [...]


    3. Interesting look at the navigator Captain Cook picked up in Tahiti to help him find his way around the Pacific Ocean.Accounts of first contacts between Polynesians and Europeans plus details of pre-contact Polynesian culture. I thought I knew a lot of this, but I didn't.The book is well written and fairly romps along. It is easy to forget you're reading seriously researched history instead of a high seas adventure. The author draws a fascinating picture of Tupaia who seems to have been one serio [...]


    4. Joan Druett’s biography of the Tahitian navigator who helped ensure the success of Captain Cook’s first voyage of exploration is both an important and fascinating book. Tupaia’s early life as a young noble in Raiatea, his education toward being a tahua or priest, and his selection as an ariori—an elite sect of entertainers and keepers of tradition—show a highly intelligent and promising young man. Attack by a tribe of Bora Bora sends Tupaia, now a master navigator, astronomer and pries [...]


    5. Just the best book. I was constantly amazed at the breadth of research and the author's wonderful story-telling. Hard to believe it is non-fiction.


    6. I expected this book to tell an important story, but I hadn't expected it to be this enjoyable to read, honestly. It stands as one of the most engaging accounts of Cook's voyages I've read (and I've read a few) even without its most important achievements - allowing space for a Tahitian viewpoint alongside the British, and celebrating the incredible life of one of the most important figures in early European-First Peoples engagement in the Pacific.Druett's research delved deeply into both ship l [...]


    7. Lots of interesting stuff here though at the end I was left with some uncertainties about the author's interpretations. Druett can see things in Tupaia's watercolor sketches that I still can't and her all too brief and confident scene setting for first contact in NZ sent me scurrying to her references (which were excellent). For me, these and other items threw into doubt the way Druett sees the characters and personalities of all participants including Tupaia. It's difficult to interpret social [...]


    8. I gave up on Chapter 9 - to be honest.I was pleased when my good friend Diane told me that she was also having trouble with this read that is our monthly read for our book club - because she is a teacher and in my humble estimation teachers are awesome readers let's face it they have to read stuff that kids of ages read and try to give it a mark right? LOL So I didn't feel so bad when I decided that I just couldn't read this anymore. The story itself is fine, but the type is so small and the bo [...]


    9. This is the second Druett book I've read, the first being "Island of the Lost". I got about a third of the way through this book and had to let it go (this is big, I rarely abandon books). It was unfortunately quite boring and worked better than melatonin. Usually, if I abandon a book I will give it one star, but in this case I made an exception and gave it two. I did this based on the fact that the book had a few marks against it when I started. First, much of the cultural aspects of Tahiti wer [...]


    10. This was our book club choice for this month. It took awhile to get into it and I did skip a little in the middle to get to the end. I was worried it would be a revisionist history whereby every European would come off looking like rapacious colonialists. Certainly Captain Cook doesn't come out looking all that good, cooking his records so to speak to make the deaths from scurvy look less than they were. So much for the accepted view of the great man saving all his sailors from a horrible death. [...]


    11. I read the book after seeing Tim Finn's preview of his upcoming opera Star Navigator which is based on this book. Tim got so much out of the book and has created an amazing tale of two cultures clashing - the modern man of science (Cook) who placed zero credence on the skills of his Polynesian navigator. Cook gives no credit to Tupaia but the author leaves the reader in no doubt that Cook's voyages would have had a different outcome without the assistance provided by Tupaia. The book was a bit d [...]


    12. What an amazingly well researched book, and one that finally gives Tupaia the credit he deserves. The maritime terminology was over my head, but I loved the descriptions of encounters with the different native populations in the Pacific, NZ, and Australia, learned a lot about a day in the life of a sea voyager, and gained a huge appreciation for the cultural complexity and navigational knowledge and skills of Pacific populations.



    13. Another example of how Europeans take credit for the knowledge/expertise of others. Fascinating examination of the possible impact of tsunamis on Maori and Polynesian culture.


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