My Favorite Pets by Gus W for Ms Smolinski s Class A hilarious picture book from New York Times bestselling author of The Penderwicks Jeanne Birdsall and New York Times bestselling illustrator Harry Bliss about one child s outrageous school essay on h

  • Title: My Favorite Pets: by Gus W. for Ms. Smolinski's Class
  • Author: Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss
  • ISBN: 9780385755702
  • Page: 306
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A hilarious picture book from New York Times bestselling author of The Penderwicks Jeanne Birdsall and New York Times bestselling illustrator Harry Bliss about one child s outrageous school essay on his pet sheep Things to know about sheep Sheep live outside Sheep have wool Sheep will not learn to ride a skateboard Sheep will not climb a tree Sheep will come intoA hilarious picture book from New York Times bestselling author of The Penderwicks Jeanne Birdsall and New York Times bestselling illustrator Harry Bliss about one child s outrageous school essay on his pet sheep Things to know about sheep Sheep live outside Sheep have wool Sheep will not learn to ride a skateboard Sheep will not climb a tree Sheep will come into the housebut this will get you into trouble Seventeen sheep plus one Gus means that life is never dull on the farm From National Book Award winning author Jeanne Birdsall and New York Times Bestselling illustrator Harry Bliss comes a hilarious tale about man s other best friend.

    • My Favorite Pets: by Gus W. for Ms. Smolinski's Class >> Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss
      306 Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss
    • thumbnail Title: My Favorite Pets: by Gus W. for Ms. Smolinski's Class >> Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss
      Posted by:Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss
      Published :2019-04-11T10:21:38+00:00

    About "Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss"

    1. Jeanne Birdsall Harry Bliss

      Jeanne Birdsall grew up in the suburbs west of Philadelphia, where she attended wonderful public schools Jeanne had lots of great teachers, but her favorites were Mrs Corkhill, sixth grade, who encouraged her intellectual curiosity Mr Tremonte, eighth grade algebra, who taught Jeanne to love and respect math and Miss Basehore, second and fourth year Latin, to whom Jeanne and Mr Penderwick will be forever grateful.Although she first decided to become a writer when she was ten years old, it took Jeanne until she was forty one to get started In the years in between, Jeanne had many strange jobs to support herself, and also worked hard as a photographer, the kind that makes art Some of Jeanne s photographs are included in the permanent collections of museums, including the Smithsonian and the Philadelphia Art Museum Her work can be seen in several galleries, including the R Michelson Galleries in western Massachusetts Jeanne s home now is with her husband in Northampton, Massachusetts Their house is old and comfortable, full of unruly animals, and surrounded by gardens.

    171 thoughts on “My Favorite Pets: by Gus W. for Ms. Smolinski's Class”

    1. Just so you know where I standI think this is a practically perfect picture book by a more-than-talented set of creators. Humor, perspective, writing, parenting, siblings, farm animals, dialog, POV, persuasion--this book has it all. Recommended for those who like a little humor in the picture books and especially for schools.


    2. Okay, I am one of the world's biggest non-fans of Birdsall's Penderwicks series, which I find to be annoying attempts at imitating great girl books of the past. So I approached this new turn in Birdsall's career with my best cynic's hat on.Surprise, surprise. Okay, sheep are funny and work well with snark. But Birdsall shows a positive flair for it here. This is sort of as if you took the Sheep in a Jeep series, added a nice spoonful of The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash, a pinch of Doreen Cronin' [...]


    3. My Favorite Pets is a wildly comical and highly entertaining tale that will have readers young and old giggling with delight.Gus turns in his school report about his favorite pets and the tale that unfolds is priceless and informative. For those who may not know sheep look silly in pajamas, shouldn't wear a scarf (especially if it doesn't belong to you), and under no circumstance should they be allowed to come in your home. These valid points and many more are made clear in Gus's well researched [...]


    4. First sentence: My favorite pet is sheep. We have seventeen in our yard. Seventeen sheep are still sheep, not sheeps. Premise/plot: Gus is writing a report for his teacher. It is ALL about sheep and then some. As his report progresses, it gets wackier and wackier. It goes from "A boy sheep is a ram. He has horns" to "Sheep won't ride a skateboard, no matter how long you teach them." I must say that it reveals more about Gus himself than the sheep he professes to love.My thoughts: I like this one [...]


    5. Why?What was this? Ok, no smart-elbow remarks about this being a boy's report about sheep, duh. This is obvious. But the point of this book was not. So strange. Did he like the sheep? Not like the sheep? I couldn't tell. Half of the book it seemed like he really did NOT like the sheep and the other half made it seem like he was just using them to torture his little brother. All in all just very confusing.


    6. I enjoyed this picture book written in the form of a class report. Light on story of course, but with great illustrations that encourage going through the book multiple times and examining all the amusing details. Best spread: "A boy sheep is a ram. He has horns. The horns do not come off."


    7. Clever, clever book! You're teaching me about sheep, about families, about writing, and about behavior while making me laugh and want to read more about the main character's life. I am thoroughly entertained. More!



    8. Uproarious. Framed as a school report for his teacher, this book (written by Gus) outlines the shenanigans Gus puts his family's sheep through. Appeal for the troublemaker in us all



    9. Ha! I loved this "report" on sheep which is really a look at the sheep disaster at Gus' house. Harry Bliss's illustrations are hilarious. Some small boys I know are going to find this one very funny.





    10. Young Gus has a homework assignment to write a report on his favorite pet, and he picks a sheep. He lives on a farm where there are seventeen of them. Using ruled lines and readable childlike print, Gus begins his report with a few realistic facts about sheep. However before long the story becomes playful as he tries to make his little brother ride one, Gus gives it a shave, helps it climb a tree, ride a wheel barrow, etc. When the seventeen sheep all enter his house, pure bedlam occurs. With Ha [...]


    11. The boys' favorite pet is sheep. One of his sheep ate a scarf Ms. Smolinski loaned him. Then the boy, Gus, cut a chunk of hair off the sheep aand made it into a beard for himself. This gives humor and entertainment to young children reading this. The sheep also destroyed the house, and love to chew up everything in the living room. Gus's dad wants him to get some sleep, and not worry about his sheep. Gus says goodnight.


    12. A boy has to write a report about his favorite pet. In this case, it's sheep. It's a very cute story about all the fun things he does with the sheep on his family's farm.Illustrations are quite funny!


    13. There are some funny parts to this story. In some places, however, the author goes "too far."Readers will enjoy looking at the detailed illustrations.Connections: inferencing, intro for writing a research paper (K-1st grade)Audience: 1-3


    14. I find Harry Bliss's illustrations really pleasing. Very cute, with facial expressions that really tell a tale. Combine it with Birdsall's story of a mischievous boys's classroom composition about his favorite pets (sheep!) and you have a winner.



    15. megan winter reading 2017, children's book, picture book, animals, sheeps, pets, trouble makers, prek, kindergarten, writing, reports, first grade, second grade



    16. Sometimes our pet pals don't make any sense at all to others. They fail to see the connection. They fail to see the attraction. They are dumbfounded.It would stand to reason a boy living on a farm would develop a fondness for one of the animal inhabitants. Gus has an attachment to a lot more than one. My Favorite Pets by Gus W. For Ms. Smolinski's Class with words by Jeanne Birdsall and pictures by Harry Bliss is a laugh a minute look at a boy's obsession and report writing.My full recommendatio [...]


    17. Grade K and up; funny, clever story that's written in the form of a school report by protagonist Gus- about his 17 "pet" sheep. I think this will be a hit at Chandler - and will make a great read-aloud! At Chandler Library.


    18. Everyone has an animal they love the most and for Gus, it's sheep. He loves them so much, he wrote his report on them. Sometimes the sheep don't make great pets so maybe Gus needs a new favorite animal. Easy to read, great illustrations, nice conversation opportunities.


    19. Gus has to write a paper for his class on his favorite pet. His favorite pet is his family's sheep. His report is about the things that he cannot convince his sheep to do (like eat his little brother). Gus gets into all kinds of trouble. He doesn't really learn a lesson, though.


    20. Gus W. really loves his family's sheep, which makes it easy for him to choose a topic for his teacher-assigned report. The report he turns in to Ms. Smolinski is actually nestled within a larger story, and the detailed and eye-catching illustrations, created with black India ink and watercolor, feature lined notebook paper as well as many scenes of the boy with his 17 sheep. The report is quite casual, beginning with information about plural rules and the names for male, female, and young sheep. [...]



    21. This book was adorable! In Gus's school report he explains with great humor why his favorite pets are sheep, and what you can and cannot do with sheep.Would make a great read-aloudReaders: grades K-3


    22. Entertaining and humorous. Who knew you could get into so much trouble with sheep? The illustrations are a pleasant blend of realistic and appealing watercolor and ink drawings of landscape, barns and lots of expressive sheep, while the portraits of humans are more cartoonish. The illustrator has clearly spent a lot of time looking at sheep and captures their placidity perfectly. Two quibbles: After claiming, convincingly, that you can't get sheep to skateboard or climb a tree or get into a whee [...]


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