The Mandibles A Family From Lionel Shriver the acclaimed author of the National Book Award finalist So Much for That and the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin comes a striking new novel about family mo

  • Title: The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047
  • Author: Lionel Shriver
  • ISBN: 9780062328243
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From Lionel Shriver, the acclaimed author of the National Book Award finalist So Much for That and the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, comes a striking new novel about family, money, and global economic crisis.The year is 2029, and nothing is as it should be The very essence of American life, the dollar, is under attack In a coordinated move by theFrom Lionel Shriver, the acclaimed author of the National Book Award finalist So Much for That and the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, comes a striking new novel about family, money, and global economic crisis.The year is 2029, and nothing is as it should be The very essence of American life, the dollar, is under attack In a coordinated move by the rest of the world s governments, the dollar loses all its value The American President declares that the States will default on all its loans prices skyrocket, currency becomes essentially worthless, and we watch one family struggle to survive through it all.The Mandibles can count on their inheritance no longer, and each member must come to terms with this in their own way from the elegant expat author Nollie, in her middle age, returning to the U.S from Paris after many years abroad, to her precocious teenage nephew Willing, who is the only one to actually understand the crisis, to the brilliant Georgetown economics professor Lowell, who watches his whole vision of the world disintegrate before his eyes.As ever, in her new novel, Shriver draws larger than life characters who illuminate this complicated, ever changing world One of our sharpest observers of human nature, Shriver challenges us to think long and hard about the society we live in and what, ultimately, we hold most dear.

    • The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047 by Lionel Shriver
      247 Lionel Shriver
    • thumbnail Title: The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047 by Lionel Shriver
      Posted by:Lionel Shriver
      Published :2019-02-15T08:34:31+00:00

    About "Lionel Shriver"

    1. Lionel Shriver

      Lionel Shriver s novels include the New York Times bestseller The Post Birthday World and the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the 2005 Orange Prize and has now sold over a million copies worldwide Earlier books include Double Fault, A Perfectly Good Family, and Checker and the Derailleurs Her novels have been translated into twenty five languages Her journalism has appeared in the Guardian, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and many other publications She lives in London and Brooklyn, New York Author photo copyright Jerry Bauer, courtesy of Harper Collins.

    580 thoughts on “The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047”

    1. Shriver does a good line in biting social commentary, attacking the U.S. health care system in So Much for That and the obesity epidemic in Big Brother. Here she aims at Atwood-style near-future speculative fiction and takes as her topic the world economy. This could have been fun, but there are a few big problems. Worst is the sheer information overload: tons of economic detail crammed into frequent, wearisome conversations. One character is an economics professor, another a teenage prodigy who [...]


    2. Will try and keep it brief.Five main issues- three big, two small.1. Previously covered material.2. Finance.3. Too many characters4. Sci-fi.5. The future of the novel.1. So Much For That did healthcare, Big Brother did uncomfortable house guests, A Perfectly Good Family did inheritance- all this comes back with weaker insights than before.2. External forces can be an interesting device if they sometimes enter a story to create havoc: hurricanes, floor opens up to lava pit, asteroid kills lover e [...]


    3. Music: The Smiths - "Back To The Old House"(my pinterest page created for this book (SPOILERS): fi.pinterest/liisahietari )It's 2029. Five years after 'Stonage', when all electricity was lost for a long time, the US national debt finally wipes out the dollar, causing chaos for years. We follow the story of the Mandible family - already declining family, rich due to some ancestors' engine designs - how it lost pretty much (almost) everything (except some glasses and silver knives), how it survive [...]


    4. In The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, Lionel Shriver posits a world in which the economy of America has collapsed and Mexican-born President Alvarez is leading the country (but not the free world). In 2024, there was a catastrophe when the electrical grid failed and there was no power to be had. Cars and planes crashed and the Internet no longer existed. Water was scarce and the infrastructure crumbling. There was widespread looting and rioting. Most of the world switched to a new currency, the [...]


    5. There are so few few books I've dnfed so close to the end, which shows they achieve a special kind of badness. This is one of the most painful books I've ever attempted, the characters are totally flat, moral & spiritual values nonexistent, & every episode uniformly dreary. It's a shame because I expect the author's basic economic and social beliefs are pretty close to mine, & the dystopia she creates (with a 77% rate of income tax and the United States reduced to the level of a thir [...]


    6. The Buck StopsLionel Shriver's new novel, "The Mandibles: A Family 2029-2047" is captivating, and at the same time a humorous and chilling work of speculative fiction. Early on, one of Shiver's characters, in referencing the works: "2001: A Space Odyssey" and "1984", says: "Plots set in the future are about what we fear in the present. They're not about the future at all." Since this particular character turns out to be extremely wrong about a lot of things, I take this as a wink to the reader t [...]


    7. As always, Shriver's books are challenging, harsh and thought-provoking. I found some of the financial detail a bit hard going, and it's hardly a feel-good book, but it was darkly funny at times and I would recommend.


    8. This book tells the tale of the economic collapse in the US in 2029. Cabbage is $20 a head. The robots were once called “bots” but they’ve taken over so many jobs, they’re now called “robs”. Showers are taken once a week to save water. There’s a new global currency, the “bancor”. The US President announces that the government is defaulting on all loans. Banks shut down and accounts are frozen. Inflation is out of control leading to chaos. The government demands that citizens tu [...]


    9. This book was fantastic. It has all the qualities I look for in a book. First, the writing is great, full of witty, droll, sarcastic, darkly comic one-liners with some nuggets of wisdom to them. One of my favorites: " people who follow the rules are almost always punished." Also the novel employs an amusing set of future slang that I found amusing. The words "boomerpoop" and "roachbar" just might pop into my own vocabulary, even if no one else gets it. Secondly, the book has a lot of wisdom to i [...]


    10. Lionel Shriver, I decided, is more essayist than novelist. Though I loved loved loved We Need to Talk About Kevin, and I definitely appreciated The Post Birthday World, the rest of her books have felt like glorified and often sanctimonious rants that are frankly annoying to read.The Mandibles is a finance driven treatise about a new kind of apocalypse - rather than zombies or religious uprising, the new president defaults on America's loans and now there is a scarcity to everything and the whole [...]


    11. I was so pleased to have won a copy of 'The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 in a recent First Reads Giveaway. This was a very enjoyable read, even though it took me a while to finish. It was the kind of book that I preferred to read when sitting in my library room alone, when family were not around. It is the first time that I have any of Lionel Shriver's books and will now be on the lookout for more. Recommended.


    12. Sometimes a bit (too) heavy on the economics Shriver wants to get across, but the story is inventive. Satirical and quite funny at times. And above all, in typical Shriver-fashion, an unusual view on the ethics of the economical crisis it portrays: the good guys are not so 'good' after allAll in all, not the best Shriver-novel, but worth a read nevertheless.


    13. Lionel Shriver is not for everyone. That said, I need to read more Lionel Shriver. She's just my latest girl crush. And one of the most important authors out there when it comes to igniting healthy debate and challenging authority and the status quo. In the four novels I've read of her 13, she's tackled: the U.S. health care system (So Much For That), obesity (Big Brother), the nature vs. nurture debate (the absolutely riveting, 5-star We Need To Talk About Kevin), and now, via the all-too-plaus [...]


    14. This is easily the best novel that I've read this year. You probably know the story in broad strokes. In one sense, it's a renegade economics textbook presented in the form of a novel with brilliantly realized characters. In another sense, it's a form of doomer porn, or to use the author's own coinage, it's an example of "apocalyptic economics."I don't think this is necessarily a prophetic book. The eventual economic melt-down of the USA might not result from a cabal of competitor nations cookin [...]


    15. This book is an interesting read albeit with some problems. Unlike many of the reviewers I didn't object to the economic details per se but instead found the concept of a post-apocalyptic novel purely based on a crisis caused by loss of collective faith in the financial system fascinating. Humanity doesn't need zombies, an asteroid or a plague to fall apart, the ingredients are really already there. That said I found the core principles here a little off-putting, at times it seems like the autho [...]


    16. *Gasps*I’ve long waited to read Lionel Shriver and the recent release of The Mandibles presented me the perfect opportunity to start working on her oeuvre. Having just finished reading it, I’m still gasping for my breath. It feels as though I’m back from a particularly arduous underwater expedition. But I’m “immense” glad I read it. If I were Willing or any other character from the book, I’d describe it as “Malicious”.The Mandibles is stratospherically ingenious and a particula [...]


    17. Shriver (We Need to Talk About Kevin) is back with a fantastic near-future novel about the effects of an economic collapse on four generations of a once-prosperous family. The Mandibles have always relied on the sizable family fortune, but when the U.S. engages in a bloodless war that wipes out the nation’s finances, they must scramble to make ends meet, igniting old rivalries and jealousies.Backlist bump: The Post-Birthday World by Lionel ShriverTune in to our weekly podcast dedicated to all [...]


    18. Ms Shriver hasn't disappointed me yet and I was glued to this very scary book about the crash of the American economy. I don't think anyone could fail to see this as a real possibility. Dropped a point for the slightly lack lustre closing chapters but read it if you can.


    19. Absolutely brilliant. The author writes with great wit and humor about a fictional family, the Mandibles, in the year 2029. I would describe this novel as semi-post-apocalyptic: the US is facing a crisis caused by the lack of faith in the very foundation of its financial system. The US government defaults on all its debt and orders all gold to be recalled, the dollar is essentially worthless and replaced by the 'bancor' as the globally preferred currency, and inflation grows so rampant that a he [...]


    20. This book dragged. It got bogged down in tirades and treatises and pontification. But what a concept! The US economy implodes. It is the poor cousin instead of the rich uncle. Economic order breaks down completely, and law and order soon follow, but only in the US. The story follows members of a family waiting for the obscenely rich patriarch to die, and then all of a sudden the emperor has no clothes, or money, or assets. They adapt in different ways. You won't read an economic diatribe or hear [...]


    21. Cuatro generaciones de los Mandible comprueban, unos con incredulidad, otros con resignación, como la economía estadounidense colapsa. No hay marcha atrás y de ser una primera potencia mundial ha pasado a un paria internacional. El vuelco social, psicológico y emocional que esto supone para los personajes, cada uno de los cuales lo afronta en la medida de sus posibilidades es el leit motivo de este impresionante libro en el que Shriver parece sacar, tras una investigación exhaustiva, sus co [...]


    22. I am glad I took accounting classes along with working in the computer lab in college when I pick up books like this! Lionel Shriver, the author of 'The Mandibles', is obviously an intelligent writer who has kept up with current dotcom drawing-board schemes and Kickstarter inventors of new products beyond cellphones and tablets; but this densely written, post-scarcity science-fiction novel about an impoverished 2029-2047 United States is also a great example of a talent to postulate knowledgeabl [...]


    23. I got up to page 332 which is more than this book deserves. It's very boring, and full of dull and stilted dialogue about finance. Just as it got interesting and some actual plot happened, the book leapt forward in time! The characters are a snooze too, and Shriver's 'slang' is lame (uncruel? boomerpoop? roachbar?). And there was a bunch of racism in there that I don't think can be justified.


    24. This was almost a five for me. I almost put it down early on because of the sheer volume of information used to set up this world and this family. I'm glad I didn't. I ended up loving the family and it's dynamics and her near future world was fascinating.



    25. A few things can be said to have formed a cult around Lionel Shriver in the past few years, especially since the watershed publication of her 2003 novel We need to talk about Kevin. By and large, readers have followed Shriver’s fictional production on account of (1) her unique repertoire of topics, i.e. her keen interest in sensitive social issues (obesity, healthcare, gun control, marriage), and (2) her virtually matchless narrative voice, ever-present sarcasm, and good ear for particularly s [...]


    26. The name of this book is evocative. It brings to mind a skull, a chomping mechanism, a piece of primal human equipment. The dates take us into the future. The cover image is of a US $100 note behind a glass museum cover. And it of course references a family dynasty – the Mandible family.I liked this book despite its obvious didacticism. In another writer it would annoy me. Shriver says of this book that she believes that our society “dodged a bullet in 2008 when the GFC occurred”. She beli [...]


    27. I received a free proof copy. I have read and enjoyed Lionel Shriver before. However I do not read dystopian novels set in the future very often so have little to compare it with. I prefer the Michel Faber and Margaret Atwood I have read though to this one. It is perhaps not fair to compare. This is set in the near future and is unsettling in that the outcomes can almost be seen on the horizon from our perspective here and now. She does not pull any punches; at times this is quite visceral. I di [...]


    28. The Mandibles is both a story and a backstory of an economic dystopia. The story is that of the titular family, thrown into an economic crisis. As a novel, it's witty and engaging, though imperfect. There are too many characters, resulting in only a few complexly drawn ones and too many nonentities. The plot moves unevenly through the time span (more on this later). However, there is a good eye towards the mundane details: Food, water, toilet paper. When Shriver stops showing you how much effort [...]


    29. My conclusion after reading this book is that, although the prose is sometimes impenetrable, the story is chilling. The foundation for everything that happens is real, in the here and now, in our world. The story is terrifyingly plausible, in that the events seem likely to happen. But the prose is heavy with economic theory that seems too placed, telling the reader things we need to know, in endless dreary dialogue, and not for the advancement of plot or for character development. It also riled [...]


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